Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSteel, Gary D.
dc.contributor.editorLiggett, D.en
dc.contributor.editorStorey, B.en
dc.contributor.editorCook, Y.en
dc.contributor.editorMeduna, V.en
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-01T01:11:17Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.isbn9783319189468en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/9108
dc.description.abstractThe title for this chapter is taken from Suedfeld’s (1987) influential chapter in the Handbook of Environmental Psychology. Suedfeld used two dimensions to classify environments. The first dimension, extremeness, is most often associated with Antarctica and can be defined by assessing how much technology is needed to keep one alive. The second dimension is unusualness. This describes the degree to which an environment is different from the one a person normally experiences. This aspect of the polar environment does not capture as much attention as extremeness but it can have a great influence on polar sojourners’ thoughts, emotions and behaviours. Taken together, these simple two dimensions have had a long-standing impact on the manner in which psychological research is conducted in the polar regions. The principal focus of this chapter is the psychology of polar personnel. We begin with some historical examples of polar psychology, then move on to examine the results of more current scientific studies of human psychological adaptation in the southern continent. Next, we consider the question of who goes to Antarctica. This takes us into a description of one of the more robust findings of polar psychology, the ‘three abilities’, which is followed by an overview of what is known about the connection between personality and work performance on the Ice. The pathogenic aspect of Antarctic work includes a discussion of two other areas of research: the third-quarter phenomenon and winter-over (or T3) syndrome. The chapter concludes on a more positive note as we move into a discussion of the salutogenic effects (Antonovsky A, Unraveling the mystery of health: how people manage stress and stay well. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, 1987) of a polar deployment.en
dc.format.extentpp. 361-377, chapter 17 of 29en
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSpringer International Publishing
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - Springer International Publishing - https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-18947-5en
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-18947-5en
dc.rights© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015. This work is subject to copyright. All rights are reserved by the Publisher, whether the whole or part of the material is concerned, specifically the rights of translation, reprinting, reuse of illustrations, recitation, broadcasting, reproduction on microfilms or in any other physical way, and transmission or information storage and retrieval, electronic adaptation, computer software, or by similar or dissimilar methodology now known or hereafter developed.
dc.subjectpolar personalityen
dc.subjectthird-quarter phenomenonen
dc.subjectwinter-over syndromeen
dc.subjectinsomniaen
dc.titleExtreme and unusual: Psychology in Antarcticaen
dc.typeBook Chapter
lu.contributor.unitLincoln University
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Environment, Society and Design
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Tourism, Sport and Society
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-3-319-18947-5en
dc.subject.anzsrc1701 Psychologyen
dc.relation.isPartOfExploring the last continent: An introduction to Antarcticaen
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design/DTSS
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/QE18
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
dc.publisher.placeCham, Switzerlanden
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0002-8499-9709
dc.identifier.eisbn9783319189475en


Files in this item

Default Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record