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dc.contributor.authorThompson, C.
dc.contributor.authorKerr, Roslyn
dc.contributor.authorCarpenter, Lloyd
dc.contributor.authorKobayashi, Koji
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-08T21:20:25Z
dc.date.available2017en
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn0112-921Xen
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/9150
dc.description.abstractCommunity sports clubs have been identified as potential sites for the creation of social capital and cohesion but a range of studies note the difficulty in articulating how these concepts operate in the sports club context, particularly as bonding is often achieved through processes of social exclusion by majority groups. By contrast, Maori philosophies and guiding principles, such as manaakitanga and whanaungatanga - which are constructed and strengthened through whakawhanaungatanga - strongly contrast with western philosophies through their more explicit focus on collectivity, an ethic of care and bonding. In this article, which adopts a kaupapa Maori approach through a case study of one kapa haka club, we argue that Maori philosophies and principles have much to offer community sports clubs. Specifically, we note how the club practices created a sense of inclusiveness, where the very young, elderly, other iwi and Pakeha were all welcomed. The explicit emphasis on inclusiveness is significant in the light of the social capital research which found that sports clubs produce bonding capital through excluding minority groups.en
dc.format.extent29-53en
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherNew Zealand Sociology
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - New Zealand Sociology - https://search.informit.org/documentSummary;dn=276189290995761;res=IELNZCen
dc.subjectsocial capitalen
dc.subjectsocial cohesionen
dc.subjectTikangaen
dc.subjectManaakitangaen
dc.subjectWhanaungatangaen
dc.subjectWhakawhanaungatangaen
dc.subjectathletic clubsen
dc.subjectinfrastructure (economics)--evaluationen
dc.subjectresearch--methodologyen
dc.subjectMaorien
dc.titleMāori philosophies and the social value of community sports clubs: A case study from kapa hakaen
dc.typeJournal Article
lu.contributor.unitLincoln University
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Environment, Society and Design
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Tourism, Sport and Society
dc.relation.isPartOfNew Zealand Sociologyen
pubs.issue2en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design/DTSS
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/QE18
pubs.publication-statusPublished onlineen
pubs.publisher-urlhttps://search.informit.org/documentSummary;dn=276189290995761;res=IELNZCen
pubs.volume32en
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0003-1427-8305
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0002-1430-7789
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0002-6742-6781


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