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dc.contributor.authorMunakamwe, Zachariahen
dc.contributor.authorHill, George D.en
dc.contributor.authorMcKenzie, Bruce A.en
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-28T03:54:22Z
dc.date.available2012-06-12en
dc.date.issued2012en
dc.identifier.citationMunakamwe, Z., Hill, G. D., & McKenzie, B.A. (2012). Yield response to pea (Pisum sativum L.) genotype, population and sowing date. Open Agriculture Journal, 6, 47-56. doi:10.2174/1874331501206010047en
dc.identifier.issn1874-3315en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/9472
dc.description.abstractThis research objective was to examine the effect of herbicide, genotype, population and sowing date on crop yield and weed growth in Pisum sativum. In 2007/08, cyanazine treated peas had a mean seed yield of 508 g m⁻² , 19% more than in unsprayed plots. There was a significant sowing date by pea genotype interaction which showed that in the August sowing genotype had no effect on seed yield. However, in September Pro 7035 yielded 559 g m⁻², which was 40% more than Midichi. By the October sowing, it was 87% more. There was a distinct variation in weed spectrum, over time. It can be concluded that fully leafed peas and semi-leafless can be sown at similar plant populations and give similar yields under weed free conditions and that increased pea sowing rates increased total dry matter and seed yield in weedy environments. Fully leafed peas yielded more than semi-leafless peas when both were late sown. Increased pea sowing rate improved weed suppression.en
dc.format.extent47-56en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBentham Openen
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - Bentham Open - https://doi.org/10.2174/1874331501206010047en
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.2174/1874331501206010047en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectgenotypeen
dc.subjectyielden
dc.subjectcyanazineen
dc.subjectherbicideen
dc.subjectweed spectrumen
dc.subjecttotal dry matteren
dc.subjectsemi-leaflessen
dc.titleYield response to pea (Pisum sativum L.) genotype, population and sowing dateen
dc.typeJournal Article
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agriculture and Life Sciencesen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Agricultural Sciencesen
lu.contributor.uniten
lu.contributor.uniten
lu.contributor.unitVice Chancellor's Officeen
dc.identifier.doi10.2174/1874331501206010047en
dc.subject.anzsrc0703 Crop and Pasture Productionen
dc.subject.anzsrc070305 Crop and Pasture Improvement (Selection and Breeding)en
dc.relation.isPartOfOpen Agriculture Journalen
pubs.notesDate of acceptance: 08 Mar 2012en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences/AGSC
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/2018 PBRF Staff group
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Vice Chancellor's Office
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
pubs.volume6en
dc.identifier.eissn1874-3315en
dc.rights.licenceAttributionen


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