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dc.contributor.authorThomson, Grant R.en
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-01T01:09:49Z
dc.date.issued2008en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/961
dc.description.abstractIn New Zealand, the development of wind energy is occurring predominantly at a large scale level with very little opportunity for local people to become involved, either financially or conceptually. These conditions are creating situations of conflict between communities and wind energy developers – and are limiting the potential of the New Zealand wind energy industry. The inception of community ownership in small scale wind farms, developed in Europe in the late 20th Century, has helped to make a vital connection between wind energy and end users. Arguably, community wind farms are able to alleviate public concerns of wind energy’s impact on landscapes, amongst a wide range of other advantages. In Austria, community wind farms have offered significant development opportunities to local people, ushered in distributed generation, and all the while increasing the amount of renewable energy in the electricity mix. This thesis investigates whether community small scale wind (SSW) farms, such as those developed in Austria, are a viable and feasible option for the New Zealand context. The approach of this thesis examines the history of the Austrian wind industry and explores several community wind farm developments. In addition, interviews with stakeholders from Austria and New Zealand were conducted to develop an understanding of impressions and processes in developing community wind energy (CWE) in the New Zealand context. From this research an assessment of the transfer of the Austrian framework to the New Zealand situation is offered, with analysis of the differences between the wind energy industries in the two countries. Furthermore, future strategies are suggested for CWE development in New Zealand with recommendations for an integrated governmental approach. This research determines that the feasibility for the transfer of the Austrian framework development of ‘grassroots’ community wind farms in the next 10 years is relatively unlikely without greater support assistance from the New Zealand Government. This is principally due to the restricted economic viability of community wind farms and also significant regulatory and policy limitations. In the mid to long term, the New Zealand government should take an integrated approach to assist the development of community wind farms which includes: a collaborative government planning approach on the issue; detailed assessment of the introduction of feed-in tariff mechanisms and controlled activity status (RMA) for community wind farms; and development of limited liability company law for community energy companies. In the short term, however, the most feasible option available for the formation of community wind farms lies in quasi community developments with corporate partnerships.en
dc.format.extent1-202en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.subjectwind energyen
dc.subjectcommunity wind energyen
dc.subjectsmall scale wind energyen
dc.subjectgrassrootsen
dc.subjectdistributed generationen
dc.subjectfeed-in tariffsen
dc.subjectbottom-upen
dc.subjectAustriaen
dc.subjectintegrated environmental managementen
dc.titleCommunity small scale wind farms for New Zealand: a comparative study of Austrian development, with consideration for New Zealand's future wind energy developmenten
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Natural Resource Management and Ecological Engineeringen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::360000 Policy and Political Science::360100 Political Science::360102 Comparative government and politicsen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::360000 Policy and Political Science::360200 Policy and Administration::360201 Public policyen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::290000 Engineering and Technology::291100 Environmental Engineering::291104 Environmental technologiesen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::370000 Studies in Human Society::370100 Sociology::370102 Social policy and planningen
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Environment, Society and Designen
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
dc.publisher.placeChristchurchen


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