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dc.contributor.authorRenata, A. M.
dc.contributor.authorLawson, Gillian
dc.contributor.authorCushing, D. F.
dc.contributor.authorMenzies, D.
dc.contributor.editorLira, S.en
dc.contributor.editorAmoêda, R.en
dc.contributor.editorPinheiro, C.en
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-29T02:06:57Z
dc.date.created2015-09-22en
dc.identifier.isbn9789898734082en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/9907
dc.description.abstractOver hundreds of generations, indigenous groups around the world have passed down their traditional landscape associations, a number of which are intangible and therefore unquantifiable. Yet, these associative relationships with nature have been, and continue to be, pivotal in cultural evolution. Determining the authenticity of intangible landscape associations has caused much controversy, and in recent decades, indigenous groups have begun seeking protection of their places of significance. In response, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) World Heritage Committee (WHC) developed a criterion that intended to assist in the identification and protection of cultural landscapes. The WHC has therefore become the global authority responsible for determining the authenticity of cultural landscapes, including those with intangible associations rather than material cultural evidence. However, even with the support of the United Nations, UNESCO and the WHC, it is unlikely that every tangible cultural landscape will be sufficiently recognised and protected. Therefore, this research paper explores the effectiveness of current approaches to gauging authenticity in instances where multiple landscapes are valued according to similar characteristics. Further, this work studies the inherent relationship between the indigenous Maori population of the South Island of New Zealand, in particular Kai Tahi peoples, and their significant landscape features, as a means of considering the breadth and depth of historic intangible associations. In light of these findings, this research challenges the appropriateness of the term 'authenticity' when analysing not only the subjective, but more pressingly, the intangible. It therefore questions the role of empirical data in demonstrating authenticity, while recognising that a prolific list of such intangible cultural landscapes has the potential to diminish integrity. This, this paper addresses an urgent need for increased social research in this area, namely in identifying cultural landscape protection methods that empower all local indigenous communities, not just those which are the most critically acclaimed.en
dc.format.extent365-371en
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherGreen Line Institute for Sustainable Development
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - Green Line Institute for Sustainable Developmenten
dc.source4th International Conference on Intangible Heritageen
dc.subjectcultural landscapeen
dc.titleIndigenous cultural landscapes: Equitably defining the 'authenticity' of the intangibleen
dc.typeConference Contribution - published
lu.contributor.unitLincoln University
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Environment, Society and Design
lu.contributor.unitSchool of Landscape Architecture
dc.relation.isPartOfSharing Cultures 2015: Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Intangible Heritageen
pubs.finish-date2015-09-23en
pubs.notesAvailable to purchase http://greenlines-institute.org/en/products/publications/sharing-cultures-2015-proceedings-of-the-4th-international-conference-on-intangible-heritageen
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design/SOLA
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/PE20
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/QE18
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
pubs.start-date2015-09-21en
dc.publisher.placeLagos, Portugalen
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0002-7699-5812
lu.subtypeConference Paperen


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