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dc.contributor.authorMoffitt, R. G.
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-17T03:02:45Z
dc.date.available2009-04-17T03:02:45Z
dc.date.issued1984-01
dc.identifier.issn0110-7720
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/997
dc.description.abstractThe first paper reviews the trade and economic relations between New Zealand and Japan. R.M. Miller gives a detailed description of the importance of Japan to New Zealand both as an export market and as a supplier of manufactured imports, finance and technology. Details of the range and value of recently traded products is given. Some of the economic arid trade problems between the two countries such as the Japanese barriers to livestock and dairy product imports are described. Despite these problems Miller sees the future prospects for bilateral trade to be good. Rex Cunninghame discusses the difficulty westerners have in understanding or predicting Japanese behaviour. Japanese ways of thinking and feeling are subtly different from our own with more emphasis placed on human relationships. He discusses the observations made about Japan by a number of western writers and their attempts to explain Japanese behaviour and attitudes. Mention is also made of the Japanese obligations to repay specific favours. Japan's rapid business and economic success has occurred due to a number of reasons. Some of these reasons are discussed in Graham Kitson's first paper. They include the advantage of a large domestic market, an unusually high debt/equity ratio of domestic companies, the high savings ratio of the population and the unusual conglomerate structure of the large companies. Other contributory reasons have been the strong company loyalty by employees and a longer term marketing approach when selling. In Graham Kitson's second paper some of the complexities of the Japanese distribution system are detailed including/the role played by the large Japanese trading companies. Some potential markets for New Zealand goods are identified. Some of the changes in the Japanese consumer environment such as increasing consumer incomes, urbanisation and changing population age structure are discussed in Graham Kitson's third paper. There have also been new trends in food consumption patterns and an increase in leisure activities. John Hundleby's paper on marketing in Japan begins with a brief description of the complexity and length of the Japanese distribution system. The three main types of distribution networks are described. Marketing includes widespread mass media advertising with attractive and sophisticated packaging. Much detailed advice is given for the New Zealand supplier who wishes to enter the Japanese market. product quality and reliability of supply are important considerations to the Japanese importer. Constant communication and consultation is needed between the New Zealand supplier and the Japanese importer on product acceptability and development. A personal visit by the New Zealand exporter is another essential requirement to help establish a necessary personal relationship with the importer. The paper concludes with a detailed case history of a New Zealand company's export success in the Japanese marketplace. Keith Pilcher lists ten brief but pertinent keys to success in establishing and nurturing business with Japan. A number of other points are made which highlight some of the many differences between western and Japanese business practices. This discussion paper includes full text of the papers listed below: R.M. Miller, Japan: A Review of Trade and Economic Relations Between Japan and New Zealand; R.R. Cunninghame, The Japanese Psyche : Are the Japanese Really Unique?; G.W. Kitson, The Japanese Economic System and the Groups that Make it Work - Companies, Politicians and Bureaucrats; G.W. Kitson, Business Practices in Japan - New Zealand Successes and Failures in Adapting; G.W. Kitson, The Japanese Consumer - Trends and Changes; J.M. Hundleby, Marketing in Japan; K.R. Pilcher, Establishing and Nurturing Busisness with Japan.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln College. Agricultural Economics Research Unit.en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDiscussion paper (Lincoln College (University of Canterbury). Agricultural Economics Research Unit) ; no. 79en
dc.subjectJapanen
dc.subjecteconomic relationsen
dc.subjectexport marketsen
dc.subjectagricultural marketingen
dc.subjectinternational tradeen
dc.subjectinternational agribusinessen
dc.subjectNew Zealanden
dc.subjectconferencesen
dc.titleConsider Japan : papers from a seminar conducted by the Japan Centre of Christchurch held at the Chamber of Commerce conference room, 11 May 1983en
dc.typeDiscussion Paperen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::340000 Economics::340200 Applied Economics::340201 Agricultural economicsen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::340000 Economics::340200 Applied Economics::340206 International economics and international financeen
lu.contributor.unitAgribusiness and Economics Research Uniten


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