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dc.contributor.authorHuang, Yue (Helena)
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-01T23:33:59Z
dc.date.available2011-11-01T23:33:59Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/3990
dc.description.abstractThere has been an increasing interest in (re)developing Chinese heritage sites in New Zealand over the past decade, particularly since former Prime Minister Helen Clark made a public apology in 2002 for discriminatory laws imposed on Chinese immigrants in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This renewed interest is apparent in a range of initiatives, including the proposed addition of ten Chinese gold rush-era sites to the Register of Historic Places Trust in 2003, redevelopment of Arrowtown Chinese settlement in 2004, the plans to reconstruct the Lawrence Chinese Camp and the recently opened Chinese garden in Dunedin. Most recently, in July 2008, a Chinese heritage trail for Otago has been proposed. This research is based on three case study sites of the South Island: Chinatown of Shantytown on the West Coast, Lawrence Chinese Camp and Arrowtown Chinese settlement in Otago, which are at different stages of development and have differing management foci (for example commercial vs. conservationist). This thesis reports on findings of the research from interviews conducted with stakeholders involved in these sites and with Chinese group tour guides and outlines the history, the (re)development background, the management and marketing approach, the current visitation and stakeholders’ view of each of the three sites. Particular focus has been given to exploring the tourism potential of these Chinese heritage sites to domestic and international tourists, including Chinese group tourists. Based on the findings and informed by heritage and heritage tourism literature and research, this thesis discusses the rationale for the current (re)development of Chinese heritage in New Zealand, its tourism potential and markets, the challenges faced in interpreting and promoting these sites. Finally, suggestions are made regarding how this Chinese gold mining heritage could possibly be best (re)developed and interpreted to visitors.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectgold mining heritageen
dc.subjectheritage tourismen
dc.subjectChinese tourismen
dc.subjectNew Zealanden
dc.subjectearly settlersen
dc.titleAn analysis of the development of Chinese heritage sites in New Zealand and their potential for tourismen
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Tourism Managementen
lu.thesis.supervisorFountain, Joanna
lu.thesis.supervisorPerkins, Harveyen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Social Science, Parks, Recreation, Tourism and Sporten
dc.subject.anzsrc150605 Tourism Resource Appraisalen
dc.subject.anzsrc1506 Tourismen


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