Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorTham, Kah Cheng
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-26T23:56:35Z
dc.date.available2021-09-26T23:56:35Z
dc.date.issued1971
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/14240
dc.description.abstractMost of the nitrogen in soils is organically bound. This organic nitrogen is not available to the growing plants unless mineralized to the inorganic forms, namely: ammonium, nitrite and nitrate. On most normal soils however, the amount of nitrite present is usually negligible. Nitrogen mineralization is essentially a biological process. The pattern and amount of mineral-N produced annually must to a large degree be influenced by the environmental factors and therefore both are subject to seasonal variations. Also of particular interest is the efficiency with which the nitrogen mineralized each year is utilized in crop production. In recent years, there has been a growing concern on the extent of leaching losses. Allison (1965) pointed out that recoveries in harvested crops of nitrogen released from the soil, or added as fertilizer, were generally less than 50%. The aim of this study was to establish the seasonal variations of inorganic nitrogen levels, leaching losses and nitrogen mineralization, under different management practices.en
dc.format.extentv, 103 pages
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherLincoln College, University of Canterbury
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectnitrogenen
dc.subjectsoil analysisen
dc.subjectnitrogen leachingen
dc.subjectammonium contenten
dc.titleSeasonal variation of mineral nitrogen, its leaching losses and nitrogen mineralization under different management practices: A thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the Degree of Master of Agricultural Science in the University of Canterburyen
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Canterburyen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Agricultural Scienceen
lu.thesis.supervisorWalker, T.
lu.thesis.supervisorAdams, A.
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Agricultural Sciences
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. If you are the author of this item, please contact us if you wish to discuss making the full text publicly available.en
dc.subject.anzsrc20204106 Soil sciencesen
dc.subject.anzsrc2020300411 Fertilisers (incl. application)en
dc.subject.anzsrc2020410601 Land capability and soil productivityen


Files in this item

Default Thumbnail
Default Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record