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dc.contributor.authorCullen, Rossen
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-28T03:02:04Z
dc.date.issued2009en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/3669
dc.description.abstractEconomists are in danger of being outcompeted in environmental decision making by researchers from other disciplines. Decision makers need information to be able to evaluate and to make choice. Economists apply considerable effort to complete non market valuation studies, and cost benefit analyses, to inform decision makers but the information generated in those studies is often difficult for non-economists to understand. Decision makers may also have an aversion towards monetary valuation of preferences for aspects of the environment. Alternatives to non market valuation and cost benefit analysis, including cost effectiveness analysis (CEA) and cost utility analysis (CUA), provide low cost, practical ways to evaluate projects and provide information for decision makers. Economists need to think carefully what is most important, the need to evaluate and provide information to aid decision making, or pursuit of a gold standard of monetising Benefits and Costs in all evaluations.en
dc.format.extent1-4en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Melbourne. Faculty of Agriculture and Food Systems.en
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - University of Melbourne. Faculty of Agriculture and Food Systems. - http://www.agrifood.info/connections/2009/cullen.pdfen
dc.rightsCopyright © The University of Melbourne.en
dc.subjectcost effectiveness analysisen
dc.subjectcost utility analysisen
dc.subjectcompetitivenessen
dc.subjectenvironmental decision makingen
dc.subjecteconomic analysisen
dc.titleIs economics being outcompeted in environmental decision making?en
dc.typeJournal Article
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agriculture and Life Sciencesen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agribusiness and Commerceen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Financial and Business Systemsen
dc.relation.isPartOfConnections: Farm, Food and Resource Issuesen
pubs.issue98en
pubs.notesPaper 98 from the online journal, Connections: Farm, Food and Resource Issues, an extension publication, connecting material in farm and agribusiness, in marketing and management, in environment and resources. Connections is a joint product of the Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society (AARES) and The Faculty of Agriculture and Food Systems, The University of Melbourne.en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Agribusiness and Commerce
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Agribusiness and Commerce/FABS
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
pubs.publisher-urlhttp://www.agrifood.info/connections/2009/cullen.pdfen
dc.publisher.placeMelbourne, Australiaen


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