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dc.contributor.authorBlack, Alistairen
dc.contributor.authorPollock, Keith M.en
dc.contributor.authorLucas, Richard J.en
dc.contributor.authorAmyes, J.en
dc.contributor.authorPownall, D.en
dc.contributor.authorSedcole, John R.en
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-20T00:23:29Z
dc.date.issued2000en
dc.identifier.citationBlack, A. D., Pollock, K. M., Lucas, R. J., Aymes, J. M., Pownall, D. M. & Sedcole, J. R. (2000). Caucasian clover/ryegrass produced more legume than white clover/ryegrass pastures in a grazed comparison. Proceedings of the New Zealand Grassland Association, 62, 69–74.en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/4558
dc.description.abstractThe potential of caucasian clover to improve the legume content of lowland New Zealand pastures should result in enhanced animal performance. Liveweight gains from eight flocks of ewe lambs rotationally grazing irrigated ryegrass pasture with caucasian or white clover at two levels of soil fertility (Olsen P values 10 or 22) were compared during years 2 (1998/1999) and 3 (1999/2000) of an ongoing grazing experiment in a lowland environment. Clovers were sown in December 1996 and ryegrass in March 1997 into the pure clover swards. Lamb liveweight gains were similar in year 2 (1130 kg/ha/yr), but in year 3, gains were greater on pastures sown with caucasian than on those sown with white clover (1290 vs. 1110 kg/ ha/yr). Spring liveweight gains per head per day averaged 170 g/hd/d in year 2, and in year 3 were greater from caucasian than white clover pasture (180 vs. 160 g/hd/d). Caucasian clover pastures had more legume on offer than pastures sown with white clover in year 2 (26% vs. 17%) and year 3 (19% vs. 12%). In year 3, 39% of the total legume on offer in caucasian clover pastures was volunteer white clover. Soil fertility had little influence on results. Early years of this grazing experiment showed that caucasian clover can establish as well as white clover if sown alone, and that sowing caucasian clover can result in lowland pastures with an increased total legume content which may improve liveweight gains.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe C. Alma Baker and Struthers Trusts for providing A.D. Black with financial support from post-graduate scholarships.en
dc.format.extent69-74en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNew Zealand Grassland Association.en
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - New Zealand Grassland Association.en
dc.rightsCopyright © The Authors and New Zealand Grassland Association.en
dc.sourceProceedings of the New Zealand Grassland Associationen
dc.subjectlegume contenten
dc.subjectLolium perenneen
dc.subjectpasture productionen
dc.subjectsheep liveweight gainen
dc.subjectTrifolium ambiguumen
dc.subjectT. repensen
dc.titleCaucasian clover/ryegrass produced more legume than white clover/ryegrass pastures in a grazed comparisonen
dc.typeConference Contribution - Published
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agriculture and Life Sciencesen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Agricultural Sciencesen
lu.contributor.unitResearch Management Officeen
lu.contributor.unit/LU/Research Management Office/2018 PBRF Staff groupen
pubs.finish-date2000-11-02en
pubs.notesPaper presented at the 62nd New Zealand Grassland Association Conference 31 October - 2 November 2000, Invercargill.en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences/AGSC
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/2018 PBRF Staff group
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
pubs.start-date2000-10-31en
pubs.volume62en
lu.subtypeConference Paperen


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