Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorScott, M. J.
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-28T03:26:06Z
dc.date.available2013-01-28T03:26:06Z
dc.date.issued1935
dc.identifier.citationScott, M. J. (1935). Winter feeding of stock in Canterbury: factors in dairy cow production. In Proceedings of the New Zealand Grassland Association, 4, 36-46.en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/5193
dc.description.abstractThe winter feeding of stock is often discussed as though it were of itself the most self-contained aspect of stock production. Many farmers feed their stock poorly in winter and get profitable returns, while others, who feed better in winter, get poorer returns. A consideration of these and allied facts, makes it evident that winter feed must be considered, not only by itself, but also in relation to the kind and quality of feeding and the returns therefrom during the whole year. The annual returns of butter-fat have often been quoted on a per cow, per acre, or production cost per pound basis. Those calculations express the effects of high and low production, but they are little informative as to causes. A more informative line of approach which displays both cause and effect is through the lactation curve.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNew Zealand Grassland Association.en
dc.relationAvailable at www.grassland.org.nzen
dc.relation.urihttp://www.grassland.org.nz/viewpublication.php?pubID=85en
dc.rightsCopyright © The Authors and New Zealand Grassland Association.en
dc.subjectdairy cow productionen
dc.subjectwinter feeden
dc.subjectlactation curveen
dc.titleWinter feeding of stock in Canterbury: factors in dairy cow productionen
dc.typeConference Contribution - Publisheden
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Agricultural Sciencesen
dc.subject.anzsrc0702 Animal Productionen
lu.subtypeConference Paper


Files in this item

Default Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record