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dc.contributor.authorWilson, Mark M. J.en
dc.contributor.authorHeyl, Jeffery E.en
dc.contributor.authorSmallman, Cliveen
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-01T02:02:45Z
dc.date.issued2008-11-21en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/6289
dc.description.abstractNew Zealand has lagged significantly in the OECD tables of labour productivity in recent years, and lies at the lower end of the OECD rankings in 22nd place out of 30 OECD countries in 2008 (New Zealand Treasury, April 2008). Labour productivity is a measure of how effective labour is being utilised as a factor of production, and is defined as the ratio of real goods and services produced per hour worked. The New Zealand Government has previously set policies with the specific aim of achieving a place in the top quartile of OECD productivity rankings (see the Growth and Innovation Framework, Ministry of Economic Development, June 2005). Despite these initiatives New Zealand is still lagging behind in labour productivity terms, especially so when compared with Australia (New Zealand Treasury, April 2008). Another indication of the deteriorating economic environment is the recent release of the Bank of New Zealand’s Performance of Manufacturing Index (PMI). In October 2008 this index reached its lowest level since the survey began in 2002, and has been in decline for a record six consecutive months. BNZ chief economist Mark Walton recently stated that the manufacturing recession was widespread and entrenched (http://nz.biz.yahoo.com/081113/3/p/96t4.html). Concerning this situation, it is imperative that the manufacturing sector lifts its productivity and competitiveness. Hence, this study is timely as the results demonstrate that Lean Manufacturing systems have the potential to be a significant vehicle for increasing New Zealand’s productivity, and could potentially be the basis of a new national strategy. The findings of this study are based on the actual experiences of 22 companies who have undertaken a Lean manufacturing implementation. In addition, this study also examines Lean implementations from the consultants’ perspective, and we also review the state of Lean education in New Zealand’s eight major universities. We pay particular attention to the role of NZTE in initiating and supporting Lean manufacturing in New Zealand through various programmes.en
dc.format.extent1-52en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln University. Faculty of Commerceen
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - Lincoln University. Faculty of Commerceen
dc.rightsCopyright the author(s).en
dc.subjectmanufacturingen
dc.subjectproductivityen
dc.subjectlean manufacturingen
dc.subjectlean active companiesen
dc.subjectNew Zealanden
dc.titleSupporting lean manufacturing initiatives in New Zealanden
dc.typeReport
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agribusiness and Commerceen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Global Value Chains and Tradeen
dc.subject.anzsrc1503 Business and Managementen
dc.subject.anzsrc150310 Organisation and Management Theoryen
dc.subject.anzsrc140209 Industry Economics and Industrial Organisationen
pubs.commissioning-bodyNew Zealand Trade and Enterpriseen
pubs.confidentialfalseen
pubs.notesPrepared for NZ Trade & Enterprise Commerce Applied Research Report No. 08/01en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Agribusiness and Commerce
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Agribusiness and Commerce/GVCT
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/QE18
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
dc.publisher.placeLincoln, Christchurchen
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0001-9949-5143
lu.subtypeCommissioned Reporten


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