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dc.contributor.authorRathbone, Brian
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-10T23:28:23Z
dc.date.available2010-11-10T23:28:23Z
dc.date.issued1985
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/2783
dc.description.abstractOrigami was chosen as a dissertation topic primarily because of my own interest in paper folding and the relaxation and personal satisfaction I have gained from the activity, Secondly, this choice was made as a result of showing a class of six and seven year old children how to make a very simple origami project. The children were so absorbed in the activity that, after completing the first project, they wanted to continue even after forty five minutes. Their excitement and delight of learning to make an authentic model of a house just by folding coloured paper, convinced me of the potential that origami has as a recreational and educational activity for children. Teaching origami to children develops their listening skills as they are actively involved and they must listen carefully to be able to follow all instructions ifr the correct sequence in order to achieve the completed origami model. Other aspects of origami have great educational significance for both the young and the not so young, but especially for children: - developing and extending manual dexterity and motor skills, - developing and extending hand-eye co-ordination, - gaining familiarity with common geometric shapes, - introducing new vocabulary and providing opportunities for further language development - developing powers of association, - extending opportunities for expressive, creative and imaginative play. The simple act of folding paper is therefore an ideal activity for children, small groups and individuals, providing much educational and recreational value. Origami may also serve as useful exercises for improving the finger movements of patients in hospitals and physiotherapy clinics, and of individuals with physical disabilities. The general aims described above provided the impetus for this work. What follows now is a list of aims more specific to this particular dissertation. The topic was divided into the formats described in the Methodology section to reflect these more specific aims: 1. To show the versatility of Origami as a recreational pursuit. 2. To integrate a research study of Origami with a management study, by introducing Origami to selected groups within the community 3. To produce a video tape of instructional Origami to demonstrate its ease of learning and teaching, as well as its simplicity and economy. 4. To make the research study and video tape available as an educational and recreational resource to leaders and groups within the community. 5. To research the topic of Origami and to show the relevance of its principles to contemporary life.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln College, University of Canterburyen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectorigamien
dc.subjectpaper foldingen
dc.subjectarten
dc.titleIntroducing origami - The art of paper foldingen
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Canterburyen
thesis.degree.levelDiplomaen
thesis.degree.nameDiploma in Parks and Recreationen
lu.thesis.supervisorTaylor, Alan
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Social Science, Parks, Recreation, Tourism and Sporten
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. Print copy available for reading in Lincoln University Library. en
dc.subject.anzsrc130201 Creative Arts, Media and Communication Curriculum and Pedagogyen


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