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dc.contributor.authorLeyden, B. A.
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-05T01:17:47Z
dc.date.available2013-06-05T01:17:47Z
dc.date.issued2003
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/5477
dc.description.abstractDrop out, or the early and voluntary termination of elite athlete sporting careers affects the achievement capabilities of high performance programmes. This qualitative study used Maehr's (1986) personal investment theory to help understand the reasons for athlete drop out and the holistic nature of elite athlete's sports involvement. The study examined the knowledge and strategies of contemporary New Zealand sports bodies and elite coaches in respect to drop out, and compared these with the issues affecting elite athletes from the same sports. A total of twenty-two interviews were completed with high performance staff, coaches, athletes, and drop out athletes, all at the elite level, from the sports of cricket, swimming and tennis. Results from the study emphasised the multiple influences on athletes and the importance of clarity and good communication in programmes. A number of investors were seen as stakeholders in athletic performance and influential in athlete retention in sport. Results from the study suggest that knowledge of drop out issues and the level of support available to sports bodies are important in minimising drop out. Results also suggest that personal investment theory may be helpful in designing programmes that enable more individualised athlete support.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectdrop outen
dc.subjectelite sporten
dc.subjectNew Zealanden
dc.subjectcoachen
dc.subjectathleteen
dc.titleDropout in elite sport : a New Zealand perspectiveen
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Applied Scienceen
lu.thesis.supervisorLynch, Pip
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Social Science, Parks, Recreation, Tourism and Sporten
dc.rights.accessRightsThis digital dissertation can be viewed only by current staff and students of Lincoln University.en
dc.subject.anzsrc1106 Human Movement and Sports Scienceen
dc.subject.anzsrc170114 Sport and Exercise Psychologyen


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