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dc.contributor.authorWangen, Steven
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-10T21:07:27Z
dc.date.available2013-12-10T21:07:27Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/5742
dc.description.abstractThe invasion of non-indigenous species represents a severe threat to the health of native communities world-wide. In order for us to be effective and efficient at mitigating the economic and ecological impacts of these invasions, it is critical that we improve our understanding of how specific traits of the invader interact with characteristics of their new environment. Understanding these dynamics can help to improve the efficacy and economy with which we are able to apply control efforts. At the same time, we can examine if there are predictable patterns of spread which are produced from those interactions, and generalise those patterns to other invasions. In order to address these aspects of invasion, I developed a simulation model utilising a highly detailed and expansive data set which reflects the demography and dispersal of one particular species, Hieracium lepidulum, as it invades a mountainous area on the South Island of New Zealand. The scope and fidelity of this dataset is such that it permits me to develop models of the demography and dispersal of the species reflecting habitat-specific variation within the invaded area. These models are then combined using a customised simulation software to create a spatially and temporally explicit simulation of H. lepidulum spread. These simulations are applied across a range of hypothetical landscapes which are constructed to represent varying degrees of abstraction of the actual landscape; the simulations are applied at different scales, and the landscapes represent mixtures of the component habitats at varying degrees of complexity and spatial configurations. The outcomes of these simulations are then used to address a number of general questions intended to identify if there are some simplifying principles that can be used when evaluating invasive spread, and to examine how these results compare to currently postulated theories regarding the spread of invasions, and how their progression is influenced by context of the landscape.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectinvasionen
dc.subjectsimulationen
dc.subjectdispersalen
dc.subjectHieracium lepidulumen
dc.subjectBayesian hierarchical modellingen
dc.subjectmatrix population modellingen
dc.subjectdemographyen
dc.subjectinvasive spreaden
dc.titleSimulating the spread of Hieracium lepidulum in heterogeneous landscapesen
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen
lu.thesis.supervisorDuncan, Richard
lu.contributor.unitBio-Protection Research Centreen
dc.subject.anzsrc05 Environmental Sciencesen
dc.subject.anzsrc050204 Environmental Impact Assessmenten


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