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dc.contributor.authorTaghizadeh-Toosi, A
dc.contributor.authorClough, Timothy
dc.contributor.authorCondron, Leo
dc.contributor.authorSherlock, Robert
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Craig
dc.contributor.authorCraigie, Robin
dc.coverage.spatialUnited States
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-20T02:23:43Z
dc.date.available2011-01-31
dc.date.issued2011-03
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000287574000021&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=42fe17854fe8be72a22db98beb5d2208
dc.identifier.citationTaghizadeh-Toosi et al. (2011). Biochar incorporation into pasture soil suppresses in situ nitrous oxide emissions from ruminant urine patches. Journal of Environmental Quality, 40(2), 468-476. doi:10.2134/jeq2010.0419
dc.identifier.issn0047-2425
dc.identifier.other21520754 (pubmed)
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/8332
dc.description.abstractNitrous oxide (N₂O) emissions from grazing animal excreta are estimated to be responsible for 1.5 Tg of the total 6.7 Tg of anthropogenic N₂O emissions. This study was conducted to determine the in situ effect of incorporating biochar, into soil, on N₂O emissions from bovine urine patches and associated pasture uptake of N. The effects of biochar rate (0–30 t ha⁻¹), following soil incorporation, were investigated on ruminant urine-derived N₂O fluxes, N uptake by pasture, and pasture yield. During an 86-d spring-summer period, where irrigation and rainfall occurred, the N₂O fluxes from ¹⁵N labeled ruminant urine patches were reduced by >50%, after incorporating 30 t ha⁻¹ of biochar. Taking into account the N₂O emissions from the control plots, 30 t ha⁻¹ of biochar reduced the N₂O emission factor from urine by 70%. The atom% ¹⁵N enrichment of the N₂O emitted was lower in the 30 t ha⁻¹ biochar treatment, indicating less urine-N contributed to the N₂O flux. Soil NO₃⁻−N concentrations were lower with increasing biochar rate during the first 30 d following urine deposition. No differences occurred, due to biochar addition, with respect to dry matter yields, herbage N content, or recovery of ¹⁵N applied in herbage. Incorporating biochar into the soil can significantly diminish ruminant urine-derived N₂O emissions. Further work is required to determine the persistence of the observed effect and to fully understand the mechanism(s) of the observed reduction in N₂O fluxes.
dc.format.extentpp.468-476
dc.format.mediumPrint
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherCrop Science Society of America, Soil Science Society of America, and American Society of Agronomy
dc.relationThe original publication is available from Crop Science Society of America, Soil Science Society of America, and American Society of Agronomy - https://doi.org/10.2134/jeq2010.0419
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.2134/jeq2010.0419
dc.rights© 2011 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved. No part of this periodical may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.
dc.subjectnitrous oxide
dc.subjectemissions
dc.subjectbovine urine
dc.subjectbiochar
dc.subject.meshUrine
dc.subject.meshAnimals
dc.subject.meshCattle
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshCharcoal
dc.subject.meshNitrogen
dc.subject.meshNitrous Oxide
dc.subject.meshSoil
dc.subject.meshWeather
dc.subject.meshVolatilization
dc.subject.meshAnimals
dc.subject.meshCattle
dc.subject.meshCharcoal
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshNitrogen
dc.subject.meshNitrous Oxide
dc.subject.meshSoil
dc.subject.meshUrine
dc.subject.meshVolatilization
dc.subject.meshWeather
dc.titleBiochar incorporation into pasture soil suppresses in situ nitrous oxide emissions from ruminant urine patches
dc.typeJournal Article
lu.contributor.unitLincoln University
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agriculture and Life Sciences
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Soil and Physical Sciences
lu.contributor.unitBio-Protection Research Centre
dc.identifier.doi10.2134/jeq2010.0419
dc.subject.anzsrc050304 Soil Chemistry (excl. Carbon Sequestration Science)
dc.subject.anzsrc0503 Soil Sciences
dc.subject.anzsrc0702 Animal Production
dc.relation.isPartOfJournal of Environmental Quality
pubs.issue2
pubs.organisational-group|LU
pubs.organisational-group|LU|Agriculture and Life Sciences
pubs.organisational-group|LU|Agriculture and Life Sciences|SOILS
pubs.organisational-group|LU|BPRC
pubs.organisational-group|LU|Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group|LU|Research Management Office|QE18
pubs.publication-statusPublished
pubs.volume40
dc.identifier.eissn1537-2537
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0002-5978-5274
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0002-3082-994X


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