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dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Rachael M.en
dc.date.accessioned2008-08-22T02:40:27Z
dc.date.issued2007en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/585
dc.description.abstractGeographical indications (GIs) are one form of protective labelling used to indicate the origin of food and alcohol products. The role of protected geographical indicators as a promising sustainable rural development tool is the basis for this research. The protection of geographical indications is a rather controversial subject and much research is still required for both sides of the debate. The research method employed for this study is qualitative critical social science. Two Case studies are used to investigate the benefits brought to rural areas through the protection of GIs. The case studies include the GIs Jersey Royal and Welsh Lamb both from the United Kingdom a member of the European Union (the EU is in favour of extended protection of GIs for all agro-food products under the 1994 WTO/TRIPS agreement on geographical indications). Twenty-five indepth interviews were conducted for this study the duration of the interviews was approximately one hour. The study identifies predominantly indirect links between GIs and sustainable rural development, through economic and social benefits bought to rural areas by the GIs investigated - less of a connection was found to ecological elements. No considerable cost for GI protection was discovered. This finding suggests that GIs are worthwhile for implementation in New Zealand as a rural development tool.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.subjectgeographical indicationen
dc.subjectprotected designation of originen
dc.subjectprotected geographical indicationen
dc.subjectsustainable rural developmenten
dc.subjectlabel of originen
dc.subjectWelsh lamben
dc.subjectJersey royal potatoen
dc.subjectagro-food productsen
dc.subjecttrade-related aspects of intellectual property rightsen
dc.titleDo geographical indications promote sustainable rural development? : two UK case studies and implications for New Zealand rural development policyen
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Natural Resources Management and Ecological Engineeringen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::340000 Economics::340200 Applied Economics::340213 Economic development and growthen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::300000 Agricultural, Veterinary and Environmental Sciences::300900 Land, Parks and Agriculture Management::300903 Sustainable developmenten
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Environment, Society and Designen
lu.contributor.unit/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design/EMGen
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design/EMG
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden


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